Is imparting wisdom something we inherently do?

James Cooper
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Albert Einstein once said: “Wisdom is not a product of schooling but of the lifelong attempt to acquire it.’ Now, Einstein was a pretty smart guy apparently, I certainly know a lot less about thermodynamics than he does and I’m willing to bet the above quote isn’t the sort of thing he said after 5 pints and a kebab on a Saturday night…

What I think he’s trying to get at, at least, is that we should never stop learning in order to become wiser. So if that’s the case then arguably there’s no discrimination on learning, whether it’s learning a new language, how to cook, or how to juggle… by this token, learning is making you fundamentally wiser.

Which brings me to the crux of what this article is all about, as a teacher your daily life (on weekdays between the hours of 9-3:30pm at least) is made up of educating others, imparting the wisdom you, yourself, have absorbed through your own studies.

It’s easy to forget that point, between the lesson planning, classroom display decorating and coursework marking. Your job helps to influence hundreds of young minds, to shape them and mould them into wiser, more self-aware and intrinsically knowledgeable human beings.

Think back to the teachers you had at school that truly inspired you, what made them stand out? What gave him or her that special something that allows you to remember them to this day? It certainly wasn’t the coursework they gave you or the written exams, it was probably more to do with their attitude towards you and how they made you feel when you stepped into their class or answered a question.

Did they truly make you stop and think about the subject matter and did you leave each class feeling like you were a little wiser?

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