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We are Engage• 3 Min read

16th June 2021

7 little changes that’ll make a big difference to your wellbeing.

The Annual Index Teacher Well-being has found that almost 75 per-cent of Teachers are stressed. Moreover, the majority of teachers have considered changing professions due to the strain it has on their mental health and well-being. To struggle with mental health issues in the form of either experiencing behavioural, psychological or physical symptoms because of work is of great concern, and it is something that one cannot avoid but to implement a holistically healthier lifestyle. 

Teaching is a demanding yet rewarding profession, although many may do it but few can stick it out with passion and tenacity to see great results in the end. With the school holidays s soon approaching, this will be a good time putting these little changes into practice.  

Let’s have a look at the following 7 tips for making your well-being a priority. 

  1. find your why

Do something on a weekly basis that brings memories or reminds you of why you decided to pursue a Teaching profession in the first place, by doing this it will bring you to a place of reconnecting to your purpose. Implement a POA (plan of action) that you will adhere to and enjoy with your students. This could be using your favourite teaching strategy, or engaging in an educational game that reminds you of the impact you are making in their lives. 

  2. gratitude and kindness goes a long way

This is probably something that most people tend to neglect within their work. However, it plays an incredible role towards oneself feeling great. I encourage you to consider ways in which you can incorporate and amplify gratitude and kindness into your day.  They are absolutely contagious and will cause a ripple effect in your classroom too. Perhaps, before you call it a night, you could list down your ‘Wins’ of the day according to your personal standard of achievement. There is a Gratitude Journal  app that you can check out and could help you to keep track.

  3. establish an effective briefing and mentoring structures

Most teachers that I have engaged with, have often mentioned how exacting this role can be from the various challenges one will encounter in the classroom. This is of course inevitable, however, how one manages to deal with these unforeseen challenges is key. To avoid being stuck in a rut, set up structures that will assist you to keep focus on solutions rather than problems. Ponder on setting up debriefing structured sessions to assist you in managing your thinking when faced with a challenge, and how to tackle it. You could also opt to work with a colleague who will support you as you both work on an established formal mentor relationship structure. 

  4. good sleeping habits

We all know that sleep plays an essential role in our health, and a good night’s sleep strengthens the body to recuperate and allows us to wake up and ready to take on the day. 

However, this can be a difficult task should you be continuously working late nights, as this could potentially lead to various factors, such as sleep disorders, medical conditions and mental health. Try to develop a smooth-running bedtime routine, you could include reading a relaxing book, taking a nice soothing bath or practising light meditation. You could also use a sleeping app. 

  5. remain focused on your goals

With the many changes and uncertainties taking place around us, one can easily become distracted from achieving their goals. So setting your goals is a great start steering in the right direction and fuelling your motivation to achieve all that you set out. I encourage you to tackle a big goal by breaking it into feasible sub-goals for yourself, by doing this you won’t feel overwhelmed but feel more in control. As a daily practice, look at your list of goals and choose one to tackle for the day; I can guarantee you that you will have a sense of satisfaction and accomplishment once you are done. 

  6. increase your eq (emotional quotient / emotional intelligence)

There are five components of Emotional Intelligence – self-awareness, self-regulation, motivation, empathy and social skills. And they all significantly contribute to your well-being in various ways. I want to motivate you to begin thinking of ways you can manage stress within whatever season of life you’re in, whether that be doing a fun hobby, spending time with loved ones, building in exercises that involve deep breathing or even watching a favourite movie / series that gives you the giggles – laughter is always the best form of therapy. Set time aside to do things as you commit and build a daily routine. Here are a few great (and free apps) you can use, Reachout Breathe  and Smiling Mind.  


  7. put clear boundaries between home and school

When you insert firm boundaries, you give permission for yourself to conserve time for work and time for yourself. Start by keeping within bounds the amount of school work you bring home. Set a reasonable time for leaving school and stick to it. As you’re travelling home, switch off your teacher mindset by creating an end-of-day ‘practice’ – this can be done by taking a midday stroll to the park. You instil discipline by reminding yourself that there is time for everything, and what cannot be accomplished within a day, will be completed the next day. 

Here is a kindness / mindfulness calendar that you can use to help make your schedule easier to manage.

 

 

Ready to get started? Register today.

If you’re ready to start your teaching adventure in Europe, you can register with Engage. One of our local experts, all of whom are local ex-teachers from with experience of teaching in the UK and other international locations, will help you set up a personalised relocation and career plan. Your personal consultant will be available to guide and assist you every step of the way, from finding your new teaching role to settling into your new home. We’ll even meet you off the plane!

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